Posted by Lori Ann Lacey on 9/18/2019

As you've gotten older, you have become successful at living an energy efficient lifestyle. You purchased a fairly green home and have developed good habits for living green. Now you have children who are reaching an age to start doing things on their own and contribute to household chores and upkeep. Awesome. Just remember that you’ll need to work with them to teach them the good habits you developed for yourself. You’ll need to demonstrate how to perform tasks without being wasteful and will want to monitor your kids as they take on new chores and responsibilities. Start with the basics and moving on from there, your children will soon be able to contribute to your home and develop positive habits for maintaining an eco-friendly and energy efficient lifestyle.

Here are some areas of responsibility where children are likely to misuse energy and some ideas for guiding them in the right direction from the start. 

Water usage:

It is very easy for kids to overuse water. The most significant use comes from brushing their teeth and showering. It might seem to you like a no-brainer, but you'll need to show your children they don't need to run the faucet the whole time they're brushing their teeth. Teach them just to get their toothbrush wet and then complete brushing before they turn the tap back on to rinse. Long showers and overfilled baths are another way that children can unintentionally over-use water. Show them how to be efficient while showering. For example, by shampooing their hair first and then letting conditioner set while they wash their body to save time. To further assist simply use a timer to limit the length of their shower and help them become aware of time-wasting things they might be doing. For baths show them the level to which they should fill the tub and maybe mark the line with a decal so that they don't overfill the tub unnecessarily. 

Dishes are another area of potential waste. If you have a dishwasher, the easiest thing to do is to get your kids in the habit of rinsing dishes immediately after using them and placing them directly in the washer. Plates and cups with dried food and sauces require more water to rinse before putting them in the dishwasher. If you're teaching children to wash dishes by hand, rinsing and washing immediately after use is still the best method. First, fill both sides of your sink with water and add dish soap to one side. Use one side to rinse all your dishes and the other for washing. Drain the rinse side and refill for a final rinse to remove soap before placing dishes in the drying rack.

Electricity usage: 

Teaching your children good electricity management is easy in theory, but you will have to stay on top of their practices while they build good habits. The simplest way to start is by teaching them to turn off the lights every time they leave a room. This practice will quickly help you manage your family's electricity bill. As your kids begin to accumulate new technology, you'll want to make sure you're working with them to create the habit of turning off their gaming systems after use, turning off the television and DVD player when they’re done watching it and shutting down their laptops or family computer. Managing constant flows of electricity throughout your home is a good thing to teach your children and an effective way to live an energy efficient lifestyle.

Now that you have some ideas for how to get your kids positively contributing to your family’s water and electricity use its time to start thinking about food waste management. Read on to part two of this article for more ideas.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Lori Ann Lacey on 9/11/2019


39 Dock Ln, Salisbury, MA 01952

Mobile Home

$334,900
Price

6
Rooms
3
Beds
2
Baths
When you enter the front door, you will not believe that this is a mobile home. Beautiful Bamboo floors and open concept welcome you. Set back from the street which is a dead end. You will enjoy the privacy ,amazing back yard...fenced with above ground pool, deck, fire pit, nature and woods surround. Plenty of room for your toys on this almost acre lot. A detached 24x24 garage with workshop area. Plenty of parking for your camper or boat. Large eat in sunken kitchen, stainless steel appliances and a pantry/storage room. Master bedroom with private master bath. Upgrades and renovations in 2013. New water heater 2018. Great commuter location, close to beach and tax free shopping.
Open House
No scheduled Open Houses






Categories: New Homes  


Posted by Lori Ann Lacey on 9/11/2019

As a homebuyer, you may want to consider the seller's perspective before you submit an offer to purchase your dream house. That way, you can boost the likelihood of receiving an instant "Yes" to your homebuying proposal.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to help you analyze the seller's perspective.

1. Review the Prices of Comparable Homes

Once you find your dream home, you may want to take a look at the prices of comparable residences in the same city or town. This housing market data can help you narrow the price range for houses in a particular area.

With insights into the prices of houses that are similar to your dream home, you can put together a data-driven offer to purchase. Perhaps best of all, you can avoid the risk of submitting a "lowball" homebuying proposal that misses the mark with a home seller.

2. Assess the Housing Market

The current state of the housing market may have far-flung effects on how much you should offer to pay for a residence.

For instance, in a buyer's market, there is an abundance of available houses and a shortage of buyers. This often means buyers can browse dozens of outstanding houses and won't necessarily face steep competition to acquire the right residence at the right price.

On the other hand, a seller's market favors sellers. It generally features an abundance of buyers and a shortage of top-notch residences. Therefore, if you're searching for a home in a seller's market, you may need to submit a competitive offer to purchase to secure your dream house.

Review the housing market closely so you can differentiate a buyer's market from a seller's market. If you find houses are selling quickly at or above sellers' initial asking prices, you likely are operating in a seller's market. Or, if you find houses linger on the real estate market for many weeks or months and sell at or below sellers' initial asking prices, you may be working in a buyer's market.

3. Collaborate with a Real Estate Agent

A real estate agent is a homebuying expert who can provide you with housing market insights that you may struggle to obtain elsewhere. Plus, he or she can help you evaluate the seller's perspective so you can submit a competitive offer to purchase the home of your choice.

Let's not forget about the assistance that a real estate agent provides throughout the property buying journey, either. A real estate agent can help you hone your home search and find your ideal residence in no time at all. Furthermore, if you have concerns or questions at any point during the homebuying journey, a real estate agent is ready to address them.

Want to purchase your dream house at a price that matches your budget? Consider the seller's perspective – you'll be glad you did. If you review the seller's perspective, you can craft a competitive homebuying proposal and move closer to acquiring your ideal house at a budget-friendly price.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Lori Ann Lacey on 9/4/2019

Before you decide what grass to purchase for your lawn take a moment to assess your life and yard to select the best warm or cool-season grass variety for you. Here are some crucial items to think about that will affect your choice of grass. 

How will your lawn be used?

Think about where and why you're planting sod. If your installing new grass for your front lawn the use may be more for aesthetics than active use. If planting for your backyard the grass might see more traffic, and if you have children who will play outside frequently or pets that live in the yard, you’ll want to select a more rough and tough variety of grass for your climate zone. If the lawn is just for show, a beautiful but sensitive grass might do well for you.

What are the conditions in your yard?

Does your yard already allow for drainage? Your yard might already have an irrigation system, or you may need to install one. Make sure your yard is or can be well-prepared for the grass you select. If implementing an irrigation system will be difficult, or simply isn't cost effective so it won't fit in your budget consider a grass that won't need so much drainage. Look at the terrain of your yard. Will the area you're planting be easy or challenging to mow? If on a hill perhaps you want to plant a grass that only needs mowing once or twice a month or a grass that looks good if left to grow long. 

Assessing sun and shade

Even if you know what climate zone you live in you’ll still need to assess the sun and shade situation for your yard in particular. Observe your yard throughout the day, over the course of a few days. Track where the sun hits throughout the day and what areas have shade, and at what times. Tracking will help you narrow down your grass selections before you start looking at costs. 

Cost. 

How does lawn maintenance fit into your budget? If you want a grass that needs lots of irrigation or regular fertilizer, you'll need to account for the ongoing cost. Make sure you can afford to continue taking care of your lawn over the long term so that you can protect your investment. 

With this information you can review the grass varieties available to you, that suit your climate zone and make the best selection. If a lush front lawn or hearty backyard that can handle kids playing is essential to you, discuss your needs with your real estate agent so that they can include information about each lawn in the houses they present you and help you find the right yard for your lifestyle.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Lori Ann Lacey on 8/28/2019

When many homeowners set out to declutter their home, they aren’t quite sure of what they’re getting into. Decluttering is a big job that requires some planning and an understanding of your end goals.

Some homeowners are setting out to declutter their home because they’re moving in the near future and want to simplify their move or make their home more appealing to potential buyers. Others have just noticed the junk piling up in their drawers and on their countertops and are fed up.

Regardless of your situation, if you want to declutter you’ve come to the right place.

In today’s post, we’re going to talk about one of the best ways to set out on your mission of decluttering your home.

Why room by room?

Decluttering a home can take a lot of time and can be demotivating if you aren’t seeing a lot of progress. One way to break this process down into more manageable pieces is to declutter your home one room at a time.

This method also helps you manage the time you plan on spending decluttering. If your goal is to declutter one room per week until you move, then make sure you have 4 or 5 weeks to complete your cleaning and decluttering.

Bathroom

We’ll start with one of the smaller and easier rooms in your home, the bathroom. A good way to start is by going through your closet and cabinet and getting rid of old supplies and medicines.

Have a first aid kit that you haven’t touched in five years? There’s a good chance most things in it are expired anyway.

Once you’re done throwing out expired items, see if you can reorganize what’s left. A good way to take advantage of the space in a small bathroom is to use door hangers on the inside of your bathroom closet for hanging brooms, dustpans, mops, etc.

Does your bathroom also have messy stacks of assorted towels? One good solution is to roll up your hand towels and store them vertically in a basket that will be kept in your closet. This prevents your stacks of towels from tumbling over, never to be straightened again.

Kitchen

It’s amazing how kitchen utensils and appliances can add up over the years. Do you have a garlic clove grinder that’s been sitting in your drawer for years? Chances are you can toss it out.

Once you’ve made some space in your kitchen drawers and cabinets, bring some order to what’s left by using compartments and stackable organizers. This will help keep you on track by giving each item in your kitchen a “home.”

Bedrooms

You probably already guessed it, but the most disorganized area in most bedrooms is the closet. A good rule of thumb when cleaning out clothes is to ask yourself if you’ve worn the item since this time last year. If not, there’s a good chance you can safely donate it to a thrift store.

Have a tendency of throwing dirty clothes in piles on the floor? Make things easier on yourself by keeping a clothing bin nearby that you can toss all of your dirty clothes into and worry about sorting them later.